Local Talent! This Irish Woman Designed Costumes For The Beauty And The Beast Remake!

If you've seen the film, you'll know the dresses are super gorgeous.

Disney’s live-action remake of Beauty And The Beast took in a whopping €2.2 million on its opening weekend, which is no surprise as it brought the original animation to beautiful, colourful life.

While the music and actors were largely responsible, nothing quite sets the scene like the film’s costumes.

Kildare woman, Sinead O’Sullivan, worked as an assistant costume designer to Jacqueline Durran on the film, and she recently shared on Instagram how our favourite costumes were made.

Sinead is passionate about environmentally friendly clothing, and even created The Costume Directory, a guide which provides designers with information about sustainability, environmental responsibility and fair trade.

@beautyandthebeast is out today! I was an assistant designer to Jacqueline Durran on the job, which had a costume team of almost 100 people. As a team, we tried to source ethical, fair-trade and sustainable fabrics wherever possible. For Belle's "red cape look" in particular we decided to challenge ourselves to see how difficult it would be to create a costume that was head to toe fair-trade, organic and sustainable, but which didn’t compromise Jacqueline's design. We contacted Eco Age, who provided us with a set of criteria which we could adhere to. All of the production was done in our in-house workshops, and the whole costume team got involved in the challenge. This specific costume required 12 different fabrics to make her cape, jacket, blouse, bodice, skirts and bloomers, with trims and ties, and we ensured that each element was certified organic and fair-trade. Our dyeing team took on the challenge of using natural and low impact dyes, and printing with traditional wood blocks, which the set carpenters helped make in the construction department, from redundant bits of the set. Some of the fabrics and trims used were vintage, including the cape which was made from hand-woven Scottish Jacob’s wool, that was then over-dyed using madder. The fabric for the jacket was made using a hand-woven linen found on E-bay, which was actually a lady in manchester’s school project from the 1960’s. The rest of the fabrics were sourced from fairtrade co-operatives in India and Nepal. #whomademyclothes #whomademycostume #ethicalcostume #ootd #jacquelinedurran #fairtrade #behindthescenes #beautyandthebeast #artisan #organic #naturaldyes #vintage #disney #sustainable @beautyandthebeast

A post shared by Sinéad O'Sullivan (@thecostumedirectory) on

“As a team, we tried to source ethical, fair-trade and sustainable fabrics wherever possible. For Belle’s ‘red cape look’ in particular, we decided to challenge ourselves to see how difficult it would be to create a costume that was head to toe fair-trade, organic and sustainable, but which didn’t compromise Jacqueline’s design. We contacted Eco Age, who provided us with a set of criteria which we could adhere to,” Sinead wrote on Instagram.

“Our dyeing team took on the challenge of using natural and low impact dyes, and printing with traditional wood blocks, which the set carpenters helped make in the construction department, from redundant bits of the set.

“Some of the fabrics and trims used were vintage, and the fabric for the jacket was made using a hand-woven linen found on E-bay, which was actually a lady in Manchester’s school project from the 1960’s. The rest of the fabrics were sourced from fairtrade co-operatives in India and Nepal.”

Well done to Sinead and the team!

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